Leaderless World

The G-Zero World

I agree on every single word:

We live in a crisis-prone age. In the past 44 months, we’ve endured the dips and gyrations of an international financial crisis, the worst economic slowdown since the 1930s, a wave of turmoil across North Africa and the Middle East, and Europe’s worst crisis of confidence since the Second World War. Unfortunately, we can’t expect smoother sailing in years to come because, for the first time in seven decades, we now live in a world without global leadership.

[…]

So we’ve entered a period of transition. The old order, call it a U.S.-led G7 world, no longer reflects the true international balance of power. But there is not yet a new order to take its place. That’s why global markets are in for an extended (and tumultuous) period of transition, one that’s especially vulnerable to crises that appear suddenly and from unexpected directions. It’s a G-Zero world.

(mon emphase) — Ian Bremmer on the Harvard Business Review Blog

Quote of the Day

Quote of the Day | 2011, Oct. 4

Daniel Kahneman on Why Do Sandwiches Taste Better When Someone Else Makes Them?

When you make your own sandwich, you anticipate its taste as you’re working on it. And when you think of a particular food for a while, you become less hungry for it later. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, for example, found that imagining eating M&Ms makes you eat fewer of them. It’s a kind of specific satiation, just as most people find room for dessert when they couldn’t have another bite of their steak. The sandwich that another person prepares is not “preconsumed” in the same way.

Quote of the Day

Quote of the Day | 2011, Sep. 20

From the Seth Godin’s Blog

For the first time in its history, the editors at The New Yorker know which articles are being read. And they know who’s reading them.

They know if the cartoons are the only thing people are reading, or if the fiction really is a backwater. They know when people abandon articles, and they know that the last 3,000 words of a feature on the origin of sand is being widely ignored.

They also know, or should know, whether people are looking at the ads, and what the correlation is between ad lookers and article readers. The iPad app can keep track of all of this, of course.

The question then: should they change? Should the behavior of readers dictate what they publish?

Of course, this choice extends to what you publish as well, doesn’t it?

[updated: I fear many people missed my points here. A. this isn’t a post about the New Yorker. and B. I’m not sure it should change. Perhaps it’s the stuff we don’t read that makes the rest of it worth reading. Racing to keep up with your readers and to pander to them might not be the best way to do work that matters. Sorry if I was insufficiently direct in my original notion. And yes, I’m aware of the irony of this update.]